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Sociopaths as predators

How to avoid gold diggers

Spotting the Red Flags of Love Fraud

By Sally Anne Jackson

When I was growing up in the 1950s, I swooned over the 1956 Bing Crosby song, True Love.

While I give to you and you give to me
True love, true love
So on and on it will always be
True love, true love

This song shaped how I believed love really was.

For me, it was disillusioning beyond imagination when at the beginning of my freshman year at Radcliffe, I spent an evening in our dormitory’s lounge, listening to seven classmates talk. They were systematically paging through the catalogue of our Harvard freshmen classmates.

My classmates were assessing what the Harvard men we’d be meeting were likely to inherit.

“His father is giving him a million dollars for his 21st birthday,” said one blond, long-legged beauty, referring to one of the men in the catalogue.

Chaos, destruction and murder – the philosophy of a sociopath

Socipathic eyesLovefraud received a letter from a woman who we’ll call Valerie. She met her husband, whom we’ll call Dylan, at age 18, and has been with him for seven years. She thought they were happy together in their wonderful home with their family of pets.

Suddenly Dylan started acting erratically. He said he didn’t want to be with Valerie any more. He picked fights. She asked Dylan to leave, but made it clear that she was willing to do whatever was necessary to help him. So he left, and wouldn’t tell her where he was. Eventually, Valerie’s intuition told her to check her husband’s Facebook page, where she found Dylan’s love letters to another woman.

Then Valerie found how Dylan described himself on another website. Here’s what he wrote:

‘See What A Great Guy I Am?’ A tactic abusers deploy – right under everyone’s nose

FreeDigitalPhotos.net

FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Editor’s note: This post was contributed by the Lovefraud reader who goes by “D2.”

The coffee shop filled quickly as people grabbed their caffeine fixes before heading to the office. I sat with my book and my latte, glancing around the room occasionally to rest my eyes and then refocusing on the page. As I looked up once again, I noticed one of the baristas conversing intently with a middle-aged man over by a cork board on a side wall. I couldn’t hear them over the din of the other customers, but they appeared to be discussing something tacked on the board.

Nothing interesting going on here…except something about this man snagged my attention, something about his body language. He was a little too “on,” trying a little too hard to be engaging and pleasant. It felt like one of those movie distraction scenes where the husband corners his wife in the living room when she’s come home early and makes loud, cheery conversation with her while the girl he’s been cheating on her with sneaks out the bedroom window behind them.

Psychopaths are naturally skilled at spotting potential victims

Image courtesy of nenetus at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of nenetus at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

When I was married to James Montgomery, who was later diagnosed as a psychopath, we once attended a local trade show together. We ran into a woman whom I didn’t know at all and James barely knew. After about one minute of conversation, James started offering to help her with some project that she was working on.

“What did you do that for?” I asked James after we continued on our way.

“What?”

“Offer to help that woman. You hardly know her.”

“Do you know who she’s married to?” James asked. It was a man that he believed could possibly be useful to his plans.

Psychopaths are always on the lookout for people they might be able to manipulate. A study published by Canadian researchers seems to indicate they have an enhanced ability to spot and remember potential targets.

Romance Scams Part 4: Fake dating apps and malware

Photo by Pat138241

Photo by Pat138241

Here’s yet another take on the dangers of online dating: The website Information Security Buzz reports that a number of fake dating apps have been created specifically to record your private data. And some dating sites have spread malware and malicious content.

So if you’re involved with online dating, not only do you need to worry about suitors using fake profiles to steal your heart and your money, but you also need to worry about your computer being infected with a nasty virus.

The risks associated with online dating just don’t quit.

The ins and outs of online love scams, on InformationSecurityBuzz.com.

Romance Scams Part 3: Malaysia busts four love scam syndicates and arrest 27 perps

Police from Malaysia and Singapore arrested 27 Internet love scammers in a joint operation on February 6-8. The criminals — including 11 Nigerians and 14 women — were members of four different crime syndicates.

These thieves of hearts and money cheated 108 people in neighboring countries out of $4.9 million.

All the syndicates were masterminded by Nigerians who entered Malaysia on student visas, according to David Chew, director of the Singapore police Commercial Affairs Department.

Romance scams cost Australians more money than any other form of cheating, said the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. The most likely victims are aged 45 and older.

Saint Valentine’s Day massacre: Australia, Malaysia, Singapore on love scam alert, on SCMP.com.

Malaysia-Singapore Internet love scam syndicates crippled, 27 arrested, on TheStar.com.my.


Romance Scams Part 2: U.S. victims lost more than $230 million online in 2016

Almost 15,000 complaints of romance scams or confidence fraud were reported to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center in 2016. Victims of these crimes lost more than $230 million.

In Texas alone, victims lost more than $16 million in romance scams.

Who is running these scams? In many cases, says FBI Special Agent Christine Beining, the perpetrators are organized crime gangs. Why? It’s an easy and lucrative crime. Criminals can often remain anonymous and beyond the reach of authorities. That’s why it’s on the rise.

Romance Scams – Online impostors break hearts and bank accounts, on FBI.gov.

Romance Scams Part 1: Canadians lose $17 million in 2016

Looking for love online is dangerous — and in honor of Valentine’s Day, law enforcement agencies around the world tried to remind citizens of that. The first of three articles Lovefraud will be posting on the issue comes from Canada.

Nearly 750 Canadians reported that they lost money in Internet romance scams last year, totaling $17 million, according to CTVNews.ca. But the Royal Canadian Mounted Police believe only about 5 percent of cases are actually reported — so the money lost is likely much higher.

Sgt. Guy Paul Larocque says that most of the money stolen is never recovered. According to CTVNews.ca:

Larocque added that these scams are often executed by professionals based in other countries, who may also be working with organized crime. “They’re doing that purposely to make it more difficult for law enforcement to be able to get to them,” he said. “It is not somebody just playing behind the computer.”

Convicted con artist Patrick Giblin again pleads guilty to scamming women

Patrick M. Giblin

Patrick M. Giblin

Patrick Giblin, 52, formerly of Ventnor, New Jersey, yesterday pleaded guilty to scamming more than 10 women out of $15,000 to $40,000.

Giblin did this between January 2013 and December 2014 — while on parole for previously scamming 132 women out of $320,241. Here’s Lovefraud’s original coverage of the story:

Patrick Giblin trolls phone dating lines, taking money from 132 women, on Lovefraud.com.

According to U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman, Giblin’s most recent adventures in phone scamming went like this:

From January 2013 to Dec. 16, 2014, Giblin allegedly posted advertisements and messages on telephone dating services throughout the United States. Giblin cultivated a telephone rapport with the women he spoke to on these services, falsely claimed that he would be relocating or travelling to the woman’s geographic area, and falsely represented that he wished to pursue a committed, romantic relationship with each woman.

Woman finds the ‘pickup artists’ who raped her — and bragged about it on the Internet

Tattooed hands of a criminal handcuffedA San Diego woman passed out in the apartment of some guys she just met in October 2013. She was raped. When she awoke, she went to the police.

Many rape cases end up being “he said, she said” situations, where the perpetrator claims that the sex was consensual. But this woman conducted her own Internet investigation. She found that the man who raped her, Alexander Markham Smith, 27, and his friend, Jonas Dick, 28, ran a business called “Efficient Pickup.”

The idea was to teach men how to have sex with as many women as possible.

To prove that their methods worked, Smith and Dick posted stories about their exploits — including a detailed account of the San Diego woman’s rape. It was enough to get them convicted.

Rape victim did her own detective work to find ‘pickup artists’ who assaulted her, on SanDiegoUnionTribune.com.