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Love Fraud Introduction

Love Fraud book cover

This story is true. Every incident that I relate is as I experienced it. The story, however, includes claims and promises made by my ex-husband, James Alwyn Montgomery, originally from Sydney, Australia. Although I accurately recount what he said to me, his statements may not be true.

That’s because, in my opinion, James Alwyn Montgomery is a pathological liar. A sociopath.

Most people do not know what the word “sociopath” means—hardened criminal? Deranged serial killer? These are cultural misconceptions, more Hollywood fiction than fact. In reality, sociopaths are far more likely to cheat on romantic partners, assault their spouses, lie to family members, abuse drugs and alcohol, steal from employers, swindle investors and defraud credit card companies than they are to com­mit murder.

According to experts, sociopaths make up 1 percent to 4 percent of the population. This is a huge number—of the 309 million people living in the United States, 3 million to 12 million are sociopaths. In a world population of more than 6.8 billion, there may be 68 million to 272 million sociopaths.

Some sociopaths are in jail, but most are not—they live freely among us, and not just in “bad” neighborhoods. Sociopaths roam all communities and all segments of society. They are male, female, rich, poor, all ages, all races, all religions, all education levels, all demographic groups. Their deceptive and manipulative behavior causes confusion and chaos wherever they go. Although the actions of sociopaths are immoral if not criminal, many are never arrested for anything. They may hold long-term careers in every imaginable field—business, entertainment, government, medicine, law enforcement, the military and even the clergy. They occupy many corner offices, although employees would probably describe them not as inspired leaders, but as ruthless, unethical bullies.

Anyone who becomes involved with a sociopath is likely to experience emotional, psychological, physical or financial devastation—or all of the above. In this book, I tell what happened to me and other women that James Montgomery snagged—he was a prolific con artist. Some do not want to be named. Any name in this book followed by an asterisk [*] when it is first mentioned is a pseudonym.

But this is not only our story. The twisted, parasitic behavior James Montgomery exhibited, I have learned, is typical of a sociopath. Because of my website, Lovefraud.com, thousands of other victims of sociopaths have contacted me. Their stories sound a lot like mine.

Many victims are intelligent, caring and upstanding citizens, yet they were unwittingly sucked into devastating dramas. The statement I hear most often is, “I never knew such evil existed.” It does, and this book describes what the evil looks like.

The next thing I hear from Lovefraud readers is a question, “Why did this happen to me?”

I asked that question—emphatically, vehemently. I am an honest, forthright and competent person. I didn’t deserve to have my hopes and dreams crushed. I didn’t deserve to be humiliated. Yet it happened.

Seeking to find out why James Montgomery crashed through my life, I embarked on a journey that took me not only deep within myself, but into my relationship with God and the universe. So, intertwined with this story of betrayal is a parallel story of personal and spiritual growth.

My run-in with James Montgomery, it turned out, had a larger, divine purpose. The experience, in all its affliction, was lifetimes in the making and fulfilled my own spiritual plan.

I didn’t know this as it was happening. I didn’t know it as I poured my anguish and confusion into my journal, trying to fathom why, in my search for love and happiness, my life was torn to shreds. I prayed for answers and guidance from my higher self, God, anyone who was listening. Sometimes I vociferously demanded answers.

I got them—although they weren’t what I expected.

Love Fraud is available now in the Lovefraud Shop and on Amazon.com, and through other retailers.