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Brazen Nigerian love scammers use ‘For You, My Soul Mate’ to steal £1.6 million from woman

For YOu my soul mateIf you meet someone who seems to be your soul mate on the Internet, who proclaims love and then asks you for money, watch out. It may be a professional Nigerian Love scammer, quoting lines from the book called, For You, My Soul Mate.

Seriously.

Two Nigerians living in the UK, Ife Ojo, 31, and Olusegun Agbaje, 43, were each sentenced to almost three years in jail for scamming a woman out of £1.6 million.

How did they do it? By following the manuals.

When they were arrested, the men had two books in their possession:

For You, My Soul Mate — Loving Messages to Share with a Very Special Person, by Douglas Pagels

The Game — Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists, by Neil Strauss

It is particularly frightening to think about the book, For You, My Soul Mate, in the hands of a sociopathic con artist. Just go to Amazon.com and use the “Look Inside” feature to see the easy-to-copy heartfelt messages:

When I am with you, I know that I am in the presence of someone who makes my life more complete than I ever dreamed it could be.

So if your new Internet love interest sends you emails that sound like Hallmark cards, the sentiments may not be authentic, but copied from a book.

Lonely heart woman is duped out of £1.6m by dating site conmen armed with a copy of pick-up artist ‘bible’ The Game who posed as a wealthy divorced engineer to trick her into handing over money, on DailyMail.co.uk.

Dating website fraudsters jailed over £1.6m scam, on BBC.com.


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6 Comments on "Brazen Nigerian love scammers use ‘For You, My Soul Mate’ to steal £1.6 million from woman"

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  1. Stargazer says:

    It doesn’t surprise me. I’ve had so many guys (or maybe they weren’t guys) try to run scams on me in my dating site days using lines like this. I could tell they were con artists right away. It may sound callous but I think nowadays you’d have to be living under a rock not to be aware of these scammers and to give large sums of money to someone you never met. The tragedy to me is not that the scammers are out there but that there are people who are so lonely that they fall for this – what would be an obvious scam to most people. No one should ever have to be that lonely. And I suppose I’ve been there before, too. I hope I never revisit those dark days. There was a time when I did allow men to reach out to me long distance, and these situations never turned out too well, though I never sent anyone any money. Eventually, I just stopped striking up conversations with long distance men. And eventually, I met a real man in real life and stopped using the dating sites. Though I never got scammed on one of these sites, neither was I very successful in finding long-term romance there.



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  2. Redwald says:

    According to an article on the front page of this morning’s USA TODAY, Prime Minister David Cameron, speaking of upcoming state visits to the UK for an anti-corruption summit, remarked: “We’ve got some leaders of some fantastically corrupt countries coming to Britain.” These included what Cameron called “possibly the two most corrupt countries in the world,” which he named as Afghanistan, and… you’ve got it!… NIGERIA!

    The article admits that the current Nigerian president, Muhammadu Buhari, “pledged to fight corruption ahead of his election last year.” If he’s sincere, he has a gargantuan task ahead of him.

    In other international news, it was announced last week that police in Britain and Spain had smashed a massive ring of fraudsters who hacked into the bank accounts of wealthy businessmen, stealing millions. Where did they send the money? You guessed it!–Nigeria again!

    Spain smashes Nigerian ‘CEO swindle” scammer network



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