lf1

Archive for September, 2014

Canadian man admits 37 years of lies to family, friends and four ex-wives

In 1977, Ronald Stan, a 32-year-old, cheating-on-his-wife, father- of-two plumber from Canada burns down his pig barn, fakes his death and moves to the US where he starts a new life in New Orleans as Jeff Walton.

After 37 years of living a lie, three American wives, and a son named Jeff Jr., Jeff Walton is coming clean to his lies and deceit. He says he initially ran from his life in Canada so his wife could pay off their debts with the insurance money from his death. (Upon hearing Stan was not dead, she returned all of the insurance money.)

“It’s been almost 40 years that I’ve lived this lie. And actually I’ve been a real good boy, except for the philandering. I paid my taxes, I did everything right,” said Walton, according to The Star.

Read the whole wild story, with graphics and maps:

Is this man insecure, a jerk or a sociopath?

Editor’s Note: This letter to Lovefraud is submitted by the  Lovefraud reader who goes by the name “Shanmoo.” Donna Andersen’s comments follow the letter.

I can’t believe I’ve had to come back here after five years. I had a spath boyfriend in 2008-2009, and spent many a night on this site. However, I did move forward, and I believed I had dealt with all the issues, karma and justice happened and in fact I met a decent guy. Unfortunately we went our separate ways because of my illness, at that time.

My relationship with co-worker “A”

And that brings me to this guy, we’ll call “A”. We are broken up now, and he is basically being an absolute jerk, I work with him, and I need your help to deal with him. I’m having to find another job and it’s just not right.

Advice for breaking up with narcissists

Narcissists believe other people are on Earth to serve their needs, so they don’t believe in other people’s boundaries. According to a recent article on Huffington Post, this continues even after you end a romantic relationship with a narcissist. The author suggests how to deal with the issue.

Setting boundaries with a narcissist, on HuffingtonPost.com.

Story suggested by a Lovefraud reader.

I am now the enemy, and I’ve never witnessed such coldness from the person I used to call my wife

Spath TalesEditor’s Note: This Spath tale was submitted by the Lovefraud reader who uses the name “Wiserfromit.”

I believe I was married to a sociopath for over ten years.

She was an old date from high school and had recently run into my friend and gotten my email address.

We started talking via email for a couple months (we lived about eight hour’s  drive from each other). We agreed to meet near her and on our first meeting, she said I love you. I went along with it because it felt too good to be true.

We went looking for rings soon after and got engaged about five months after our initial contact. I had proposed to her when she was visiting me in my town and the next day, she was on the phone crying and saying her four year-old daughter missed her too much.

Cyber stalking made easy with smartphones and spyware

spywareEditor’s Note: This article is a MUST READ for anyone who is being stalked or who needs to keep their location a secret.

Because of the latest in smart phone technology, husbands, wives, lovers and exes don’t need to leave the comfort of their homes, or hire a private detective, to be able to know their victim’s every move. All they have to do is secretly monitor their victim’s smart phone, tablet or computer.

Stalkers now have software such as MSpy, which is easy to install. All that’s needed is a few minutes alone with a victim’s smart phone to download the app, activate it, and delete any visible trace of it. The cyber stalker then has the ability to listen in on every conversation, read every text message, view every web page visited and download every photo, video file, password and call log generated by the phone.

Mary Ann Glynn: Book Review of ‘The Psychopath Inside’

Mary Ann Glynn ad newThe Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain – by James Fallon

Review by Mary Ann Glynn

I first came across James Fallon’s research on a show about psychopathy and the brain on the Science Channel. I was fascinated by what he found out by mistake about his own brain, which has added an interesting and significant spin to the discussion of nature and nurture in psychopathy.

For thirty-five years James Fallon has been a neuroscientist educator and researcher, and has engineered major breakthroughs in stem cell research. His research lab led to the creation of three biotech companies, one of which won a national award from peers. His main areas of study were in Parkinson’s Disease, chronic stroke, later branching into PTSD of veterans, Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, addictions, male-female brain differences, emotional memory, ADHD, and consciousness, all of which were a substantially rich prerequisite to what he veered into more recently.

Mark Manson reveals why ‘Love is Not Enough’

lennon_reznor_smMark Manson is an author and entrepreneur who posts on his website hundreds of articles about psychology and modern culture.

‘Love is Not Enough’ is a straightforward look at love through Mark Manson’s eyes.

Manson compares John Lennon’s notion that “all you need is love” with Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor’s idea that “love is not enough.” Manson sides with Reznor and warns that there are three harsh truths about love: love does not equal compatibility, love does not solve your relationship problems, and love is not always worth sacrificing yourself.

Manson summarizes that love is a wonderful experience. It’s one of the greatest experiences life has to offer. And it is something everyone should aspire to feel and enjoy.

“But you need more in life than love,” Manson says. “Love is great. Love is necessary. Love is beautiful. But love is not enough.”

Love is not enough,  by Mark Manson

Blame the victim, again

Spath TalesEditor’s Note: This SPATH tale was submitted by the Lovefraud reader who goes by the name “Sisyphus Unchained.”

He was handsome; he was charming; he had an incredible zest for life.  But more importantly he was manipulative, deceitful and dangerous.

In 2007 I met a man with whom I thought I shared interests: educational/community development projects in Southern Africa. He portrayed himself as the founder of a South African-based charitable project focused on the needs of orphaned/disadvantaged youths in the townships of Johannesburg (which much later, once I investigated further, all turned out to be non-existent).

Over the course of the next four years he skillfully interspersed his requests for funding his “charitable” works with requests for assistance with personal expenses (medical, household, family emergencies, business opportunities, and more).

Fraudulent love syndicate in Malaysia pulls in $68,955

facebookFive Nigerian students between the ages of 25 and 34, attending a private college in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, plus another girl local to Sungai Buloh, were arrested for operating a fraudulent dating syndicate on Facebook for the past six months.

The suspects formed relationships with the victims and then requested that the victims transfer money into the suspects’ accounts. So far, the syndicate has collected a total of RM 223,000 (US$68,955).

Local Girl Involved In FB Love Fraud, from Malaysian Digetst.com

Ray Rice, the NFL, and domestic violence

I would like to thank the unidentified employee of the now-closed Revel Casino in Atlantic City, New Jersey, who leaked the video of the NFL player Ray Rice punching his fiancée in the head, knocking her unconscious.

The employee likely sold the video to TMZ for thousands of dollars. In my opinion, it was worth every penny he or she received, because now the public’s attention is focused on the issue of domestic violence.

It’s about time.

In the U.S., 20 people per minute are victims of physical violence by an intimate partner, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One in three women, and one in 14 men, have experienced physical violence by an intimate partner, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence.