lf1

Shocker #1: Man allegedly kills wife, posts photo on Facebook


Derek Medina of South Miami posted lots of YouTube videos and Facebook photos. The last photo was allegedly of his wife’s bloodied body. Medina was described as “extremely jealous” of his wife, and had hit her in the past.

Medina wrote six online books, including one entitled, How I Saved Someone’s Life and Marriage and Family Problems Thru Communication.

South Miami man kills wife, posts photo of bloody body, then turns himself in to police, on MiamiHerald.com.

Story suggested by a Lovefraud reader.

 



7 Comments on "Shocker #1: Man allegedly kills wife, posts photo on Facebook"

Trackback | Comments RSS Feed

  1. G1S says:

    Yeah, he had to kill her. His friends are going to understand that – at least he hopes they’ll know the real him.

    And I’m sure they are all going to understand why he “had” to post her bloodied body on Facebook as well.

    Maybe that will qualify him for an insanity plea.



    Report this comment

  2. I WIN says:

    Donna, in discussing this on my FB page today, I have suggested in my post that Alex Rodriguez, too, is a sociopath. Wondering what your thoughts were, if you think i’m right?



    Report this comment

    • I WIN – Thanks for the question. A-Rod was penalized for “use and possession of numerous forms of prohibited performance-enhancing substances, including testosterone and human growth hormone, over the course of multiple years,” according to MLB.

      See “Alex Rodriguez hit with unprecedented 211-game drug suspension by Major League Baseball; Yankees star will fight the ban which starts Thursday,” in the New York Daily News.

      Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/i-team/a-rod-mlb-211-game-drug-suspension-article-1.1418060#ixzz2bV43TQHJ

      Here’s what is known about steroids:

      1. If a person is not a sociopath, steroids can make him act like one.

      2. If a person is a sociopath, steroids can make him worse.

      I don’t know where A-Rod started out, but if he’s been taking steroids, yes, it can encourage sociopathic behavior.



      Report this comment

  3. G1S says:

    Don’t we need to be careful, though, not to see sociopaths/psychopaths around every tree?

    It’s a chicken or the egg phenomena. Which came first? Many of these people have natural talent, but not all. Think of those who are “famous for being famous.” Are they psychopathic because their egos go to the Moon or did we groom them to become this way by imparting an importance on them that they never earned?

    Think of the culture that embraces many of our cultural heroes – not just sports figures, but people in entertainment, religion, medicine, education, and political spheres.

    Narcissism is present in all of us. We need healthy narcissism to take care of ourselves and stand equal with others.

    Unhealthy narcissism can develop into egotism. Even if the person did not start out as an egotist, you get people throwing themselves at you, granting your every wish, and overlooking your slightest fault just for the privilege of saying that they know Famous Person and have personal contact with him or her.

    Egotism is a characteristic of psychopathy, but it also is a characteristic in and by itself. Don’t we all feel a little prouder, hold ourselves a little more upright, when we receive praise for something that we did? That’s natural. It not only makes for a healthy ego, it’s necessary for a healthy ego to develop.

    It crosses a line when it becomes expected, which is one reason child development experts warn against parents who excessively praise children for normal behavior. It ceases to be effective when it becomes routine.

    Egotism has to flourish in a hero-worshiping environment. Think of all the entertainment celebrities who do unacceptable things when drunk or high. Common retorts are, “Do you know who I am? Do you know whom you are dealing with?”

    Why do these sports and entertainment heroes earn the salaries that they do? Because we are willing to pay that much for the tickets to see them.

    These are not all born monsters. We cultivate and encourage this kind of behavior. Not everybody finding themselves in such an environment is strong enough to maintain a healthy balance of people around them. If somebody seems to be countering what the cultural hero wants, it’s very easy to fire that person and hire somebody who will only agree with the hero’s every wish.

    I read yesterday that Bruce Willis was dropped from a movie after a request to do four days of work because his $3 million dollar fee was too low. He wanted $4 million – $1 million per day.

    Egotism abounds – and egotism is a characteristic of a psychopathic, but they are not interchangeable.

    Is A-Rod a psychopath? Maybe he is simply greedy. Maybe his ego has been stroked by so many others, including his fans, that he has bought their adoration that he is above any negative repercussions. Why wouldn’t he think that? He literally has millions of people who hold him in that regard. That isn’t his doing or a product of his personality.

    It has to be a very heady feeling to have that much money coming at you daily along with unending, often over-the-top praise. How would most people turn out under those circumstances? Would everyone be strong enough to resist a little bit of drug enhancement if they thought that they wouldn’t get caught? Where is the real addiction? To the drug or the money and adoration?

    The mental health profession considers it unethical to “diagnose” an individual from a distance because there are too many factors that need to be taken into consideration. There are too many traits that can apply in many different situations for many different reasons.

    It’s good to be aware, but we are not qualified to make definitive assessments about anybody, especially those that we have never met and especially without knowing their full stories.

    Thanks, Donna, for taking the high road on this matter by not making a definitive declaration.



    Report this comment

    • aotearoaangel says:

      Ive wondered those same things G1S.
      Also I know in the early stages of recovering and healing from my relationship I saw aspects in nearly everyone and was frightened by that. It IS good to be aware but I had to ground a little too- verged on paranoid I think for awhile. I guess that’s natural when the world you thought you knew suddenly turns into something much darker.
      Trusting takes time now and isn’t given freely and maybe that’s how it should be. But sometimes I miss that open free and less complicated person I was.



      Report this comment

  4. onmyown says:

    I hate to sound jaded, but if you consider that there are people playing out their whole lives on Facebook it seems like it was just a matter of time before something like this would happen. The thing that’s extraordinary about it is that he’s so wrapped in his own grandiosity that he decided to post the ultimate “Goodbye, cruel world!” immediately after the act. He was attention-whoring the murder of his wife.

    “My wife was punching me and I’m not going to stand anymore with the abuse so I did what I did. Hope u understand me.”

    He sure showed her, huh? Now her family gets to have that Facebook image burned in their minds for the rest of their lives.



    Report this comment

  5. Detective testifies that when Derek Medina shot his wife, it was not self-defense. It was murder.

    http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/detective-facebook-slaying-victim-cowering-20578412



    Report this comment

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.