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By September 23, 2012 45 Comments Read More →

Psychopath’s noses don’t work

A new study out of Australia finds that people high in psychopathic traits did poorly when asked to identify common odors. Read:

Psychopaths have poor sense of smell, study finds, on CBSNews.com.

Story suggested by a Lovefraud reader.



45 Comments on "Psychopath’s noses don’t work"

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  1. darwinsmom says:

    Kim,

    I loved your description of the sensation after a spath attack on us. That’s exactly how it feels for me: as if someone suddenly commits an onslaught on all of your system. It feels like someone just speared all their malice into you, like a rape, but energetically.

    I remember one time when I realized this feeling after I was attacked on a forum for totems after I explained the unorthodox meditation technique my friends and I used. We meditate by physically connecting with one another: we lie in a circle and connect our feet, with one foot as a receiver, the other as a giver. This creates a pool of energy multiplied by the number of persons involved, but it is at the same time shared with everyone full circle. In many meditation schoolings to be in physical contact with someone else is forbidden, because someone can then abuse the energy of the other and drain them of energy. It’s seen as a way to vampirize someone energetically. We don’t vampirize each other of course, because we share the energy with each other; it’s flowing freely in the circle, and all with respect to starting with grounding, then going through the other chakra levels and coming down again. And nobody is allowed to break contact before everybody is grounded again (meaning: everybody gets his personal energy back). Anyway, this moderator of the totem forum became extremely vicious to me and well treated me as if I was some demon to be ousted. And that’s when I felt as if she had tried to penetrate all her malicious energy into me. I responded calmly, wishing peace and goodbye for all its members, envisioning love in my heart for them as well as myself.

    I had the same energy-rape feeling after the phonecall from the colleague past summer about his maps and such.

    In any case, I treat this penetration of another one’s malicious energy as if it were a demon: by shrouding myself in an energy of love and telling it to return whence it came from. When I do that, it shrinks to baby-size levels and recedes. If we respond in anger or rage or in fear to this type of energy within us, it usually just gets bigger. This type of malicious energy hurled at you feeds on anger and fear.

    Note: I’m just talking about the sensation you described of suddenly having someone else’s energy and malice (the ‘slime’) running amock within your system. I’m not saying that there isn’t a time and place for anger and fear. There very much is. But our anger and fear should be ours alone, and not feed the malicious energy implanted in us by another being. Because ultimately the energy they shoved into our system is still theirs and connected to them like an octopussy’s tentacle.



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  2. kim frederick says:

    Oxy, Sky, Star and Darsmom, Thanks, so much. I got something out of what each one of you said.
    Ox, do you remember Eric Berne, and the 60’s TA movement?
    Well, I think the rebellious child in me gets triggered by the authoritarian adult in other folks.
    For instance, when I managed to get Daughters car around SIL’s deliberate attempt to cut me off at the knees, out of spite, we were both acting as children. But he was cloaking his childish behavior in the authoritarian parent role. When I thought better of taking the car, I responded from the adult role. ie, I texted him that I had the car and would return it before work. 2:00.
    He then, reinforces himself as dominant parent by texting back, “You better have that car in the driveway by 4:00, or else.”
    When I calmly returned the car, and made no furthar attempt to contact him, I was acting from the role of adult.
    And Dar, your talk of introjected bad energy plays out here as well. And Sky, your talk about emotional boundry’s, too. Changing the buttons on the typwriter key board is like not responding to the authoritarian parent who is simply trying to manipulate me by relating to me as if I was a reb ellious child, while he is, in fact acting out his sence of himself as a rebellious child. It is trying always to stay in the adult mode.



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  3. darwinsmom says:

    Exactly Kim!

    It’s like Timothy Leary’s behaviour rose (you probably know a derived kiddies version of a circle with animals – lion in the right top, a turtle in the bottom left and so on). Without going too much into detail about it, the basic premisse is that a certain type of behaviour evokes an instinctive reaction. If someone acts in a dominating way, the other person will automatically take on a more ‘following’ or ‘submissive’ role. If someone takes on a following/submissive role, then the other will instinctively become more dominant (take initiative). And if someone acts against you, it provokes an against response within you. If someone shows behavour to work along or help you or wants to be helped, then it evokes an ‘us together’ response.

    You can never truly help the instinctive response or reaction within you. For example, when someone starts shouting at you and towers above you, for at least one tiny moment you’ll feel small and probably flinch. It’s not a sign of weakness and nothing to feel guilty about. It’s not something we have control over much for the initial second.

    However, you can become aware enough that these are interaction laws and recognize it, and you can then choose to ignore the instinctive response and choose to respond differently.

    So yeah, if someone acts like the dominating, but aggressive parent (top-against), it will make you feel like a rebellious child (bottom-against). While you can never can provoke an ‘us’ response in a spath, you can at least choose to respond in a different way that makes you feel much better about yourself than if you follow the instinctive urge: for instance, a leading person who has no issues with anyone (top-us).



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  4. skylar says:

    Darwinsmom,
    I don’t know anything about the TA movement but what you said is exactly right: we can never truly help the instinctive response or reaction within you. It’s because we have empathy. It may also have to do with “mirror neurons” in our brains, which help us to put ourselves in another person’s shoes.

    The other day, I was sitting in my truck and the crazy-husband stealing spath neighbor walked up and knocked on my window. She was wearing an expression meant to elicit some kind of bonding, and she said, “Skylar, I know you probably don’t like me very much, but I just want you to know that I have no hard feelings.”

    I felt my body respond to her pity ploy. I felt an automatic something such as you would feel for a contrite human being. If I had been approached by her 3 years ago, before I knew that there walk among us people who habitually fake emotions with the express intent on feeding on my emotions, I would have responded according to my nature and said, “It’s ok, don’t worry about it. I have no hard feelings either.”

    I realized though that she wants emotions. So I said, “I have no feelings for you at all.” Her face contorted into the evil that she is. The pity ploy disappeared because it wasn’t working, or at least she couldn’t see that it worked. I responded from a place of knowledge rather than emotions.

    Because appearances are SO OFTEN deceiving, it’s best to “check your emotions at the door, before they exit you.”

    I know it isn’t easy, especially if they don’t give up or if you are confused about what they are trying to achieve with their tactics. But one thing my friend reminds me to do is “don’t take other people’s behavior personally.” Their behavior is about them, not about you.



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  5. Ox Drover says:

    Sky, that was a PERFECT RESPONSE….good for you!

    “check your emotions at the door” LOL Yep, they will only “shoot” you with them if you show them.



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  6. darwinsmom says:

    Sky, loved your response!

    Yup, exactly. We cannot prevent an instinctive inner reaction… but we can choose to ignore it and respond by choice instead.

    That’s why I’m not severe upon myself when someone jumps my throat out of the blue and I feel rattled inside by it, nor when I feel a first response to be empathic and helpful with someone who pretends to portray ‘us’ behaviour. Nor will I react instantly. I’ll observe and then choose my response on my own time and terms.



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  7. Speaking_Up says:

    Sunflower

    I did everything reverse osmosis to the way I was raised. I had NO idea what love was until my son was born when i was 18…before his birth I was running around blind trying to fit into a broken world.

    Once I realized what love was I knew I had to raise my baby far differently than my family`s way (abuse abuse abuse anchor).

    My mother had four children, my father had five. Of these children one is me (always sensitive and emotional, carries the weight of the world on my shoulders; lives in deep shame and guilt – holds myself in high accountability – even when it is NMP (not my problem). My older brother (turned to crack, likely won`t see 55); My younger brother (turned to alcohol – wakes up to an immediate need for several beers to get started). Then my young sister…cold, calculating, gathers supply to do her bidding, mean, abusive, seeks to ruin people`s lives (so much like my parents). I have a half brother who hated my dad, but interestingly has the same cold personality. It took me a long time to see that.

    So, here I am, holding all of the emotions of the family because every one has checked out in one way or another. I have been through therapy, treatment centers, and my training in being a coach and counselor has all helped me pick up tools I need to live.

    I still have post traumatic stress but it is only aggravated when an extremely serious issue raises it`s ugly head – something that affects me directly. And I still suffer from low self esteem, but I am working on that through hypnotherapy. I can already FEEL the change in myself to the positive. I feel stronger and stronger every day.

    I don`t know if my siblings put any effort into having a good life, but it doesn`t look like it from where I sit. It looks to me like they all ran and hid under drugs, alcohol, and sociopath detachment and lashing out.

    Feeling like I`m choppy, not articulating well…

    Ok, bottom line is this…

    I can really only speak for myself…I have had to really work to stay alive in the circumstances I was raised under.



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  8. Sunflower says:

    Speaking up, I’m sorry, I’m having a hard time to understand what your point is. Sometimes google translate isn’t good enough.

    Uhm, yes, I can say I can relate to you, I have same role in my family as you did in yours. I also had to really work to stay alive under the circumstances I was raised under and I think my parents did as well ( questioning my mother, but that’s another story) . In my family we have a long line of abuse and I think it is a learned pattern for the most of my family members. They too hide under different strategies instead of working with them selves.

    Maybe it’s just me, but I think most people do as good as they can based on what their abilities and resources are at the time.



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  9. tdpprocessing1 says:

    This article confirms a lot. It is also hillarious. No, they don’t have the same sense of smell and even taste. I watched my last spath eat a million peppers on a sammy from subway. At the time, I realized 90% he was “a thing” and it disgusted me. So freaking self indulgent and oblivious to anything except their own needs. Just gives me the creeps.



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