lf1

Report blasts failings in Jaycee Dugard case

In probably the most horrific failure to supervise sex offenders, Phillip Garrido was released from prison in 1988. He had been sentenced to 50 years for a brutal kidnapping and rape, yet managed to convince psychiatrists and prison officials that he was “reformed.” On June 10, 1991, he abducted Jaycee Lee Dugard and kept her captive for 18 years.

The El Dorado County District Attorney just released a scathing report of the failures of the criminal justice system, especially an over-reliance on psychiatry. Here is an excerpt:

Law enforcement failed to see Phillip Garrido for what and who he truly is … evil. In part, this failure was based upon law enforcement’s over-reliance upon the psychiatric profession to predict future dangerousness. Common sense would tell you that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. For some unknown reason, psychiatry in the criminal justice system relies far too little on past behavior and far too often on the statements from the criminal — who have a vested interest and motive in presenting themselves in a better light. This problem is exacerbated even more in the prison setting, where criminals know they are being watched and know that they can get paroled even sooner if they comply with prison rules. The problem is further compounded by the fact that a prisoner’s institutional adjustment and psychiatric evaluations are given greater weight than the underlying commitment offense. Thus, the major problem with the use of psychiatry in the prison system is that the prisoners will act differently in prison — because they don’t have the freedom to rape and murder and destroy lives like they did on the outside of prison walls. Criminals then use psychiatry to manipulate the criminal justice system.

Read the 24-page report.

Complete report, including photos and exhibits.

Garrido videos of surveillance of other young girls are available on El Dorado County website.



54 Comments on "Report blasts failings in Jaycee Dugard case"

Trackback | Comments RSS Feed

  1. dancingnancies says:

    Wow, thank god for that verdict.



    Report this comment

  2. Constantine says:

    Yes, but what is really amazing is how the one kid (I forget his name, but the mentally disabled one) gave an in-depth and detailed confession, where he claimed to have watched his other two friends murder those little boys. However, DNA evidence tells us that this narrative HAD to have been the result of the lawyer’s “leading questions” — i.e, that the whole confession was manufactured out of thin air. Still, there’s a lesson to be learned here in the fact that this was EVEN POSSIBLE. (Before this, I never would have believed it.)

    I watched the documentary “Paradise Lost” (of which there is a part one and two) which goes into this in great detail. Good film, though I descrbed it to my friend as “The feel-bad movie of the year”!



    Report this comment

  3. dancingnancies says:

    Hmm.. I had no idea that the kid was mentally disabled. That puts a WHOLE ‘nother spin on it. I cannot believe his ‘confession’ ( following a BRUTAL interrogation ) was considered admissable in court. Wow. ( Mentally disabled or not, it would have been unethical considering the nature of the interrogation and the circumstances of the case- but c’mon… that’s just stooopid. )



    Report this comment

  4. Constantine says:

    Dear Dancing,

    I think his “mental disability” was mainly a matter of low IQ. I forget the exact number, but somewhere around 80 perhaps. (Which is still fairly functional, for that matter.)

    Yes, the “confession” had several inconsistencies. But what stands out is the unbelievable amount of detail that was included in it. As I said, he literally created a whole scenario out of thin air. (And if my recollection is correct, the conviction was based almost entirely on this confession.)

    In fairness, these kids did seem like an unsavory lot, so I see how it was easy to frame them. But if you ever watch the documentary, just wait till you see some of the grown-ups! (I don’t think I’ll ever get the “pumpkin shooting guy” from Part 2 out of my head!) To me, the guilty one really looks like the boyfriend of one of the moms. I guess I’ll have to force myself to watch “Paradise Lost Part 3” to find out!



    Report this comment

  5. Constantine says:

    Correction: I said, “the lawyer’s leading questions” when I should have said, “the DETECTIVE’S leading questions.”



    Report this comment

  6. dancingnancies says:

    Constantine- yeah, even if it was a matter of low IQ as opposed to “mentally disabled” ( which still I think, would make him vulnerable especially in the face of such tension and hostility ), they absolutely brutalized him in interrogations- it was completely unethical the way they “drew” the confession out of him. I would think that he became so familiarized with the details of the murder rehashed over and over to him again, that he just concocted the idea right there in his head, in order to placate the detectives/police officers… or at the very least, to get them to STOP haranguing him.

    I haven’t seen Paradise Lost ( I will check it out now that I am aware of it ) but I did watch a segment on TV that detailed the case a while ago- and I also think the guilty one is the stepdad of one of the boys ( i’m not sure if he was stepdad during or following the murders, in any case, we’re talking about the same person ) .. a neighbor had actually witnessed this guy with the three children on the day of the murder- apparently they relayed this information to the police but they did nothing about it. Which does not surprise me, considering how the rest of the case progressed after that fact.



    Report this comment

  7. Ox Drover says:

    The Confession actually was heard by the jury but not “allowed” to be considered in the trial of the other two, but it was DISCUSSED in the Jury room….which should have thrown the verdict out….the thing that CONVINCED ME…was 1) the DNA evidence _-a hair–found INSIDE THE KNOT OF THE ROPE from the step father who claimed never to have seen the kids that day and 2) a neighbor witness who SAW the step father with the kids that day. She was never questioned by police.

    Damion and the other kids were smart ass teenagers and Damion got on the stand and swaggered with his “goth” look, and hell, he was so much an ass, I would have wanted to send him to death row JUST for being the MOST obnoxious teenager I’d ever seen! LOL

    The whole investigation and all the trials and the hearings and rehearings were all a WITCH HUNT. I think this “deal” they made where the allowed them to “plead guilty” and still deny their guilt is so POLITICAL that it STINKS to high heaven. I don’t blame them for taking the plea even under the circumstances, I imagine they would have done anything, confessed to being “on the grassy knoll” or “being at Ford’s theater” just to get out of there after 18 years. It STILL galls me that the prosecutor’s office would make such a deal with the devil though and put them on the chopping block and make them take the “plea” in order to protect the DA’s office which has NOT come off looking good and the JUDGE has come off looking like a witch hunter too. But for me, it only shows how CROOKED the political bunch are in my state and I am ASHAMED but not surprised.



    Report this comment

  8. dancingnancies says:

    Oxy said

    I think this “deal” they made where the allowed them to “plead guilty” and still deny their guilt is so POLITICAL that it STINKS to high heaven.

    Oh yeah, I’m totally with ya there. It’s like hey, yeah- we’ll give you your freedom. But we’re not going to admit you DIDN’T do it. Even though we basically wasted 18 years of your life by convicting you on a charge that you were completely innocent to. Personally I think these folks should be compensated monetarily- so much potential wasted. Just spit back out into the world, like it was nothing. The judgement is definetely a bittersweet one- I just hope they nab the real perpetrator here in the end- that stepdad, whose DNA, like you said was found in the knot of the ropes. I think it was Damien who said that if the real perpetrator was apprehended, it would provide a sense of closure for him ( though he asserts likewise that he will still be able to move on with his life regardless ) That and- implicating and apprehending the true perpetrator would bring real justice to the original victims.



    Report this comment

  9. dancingnancies says:

    Not to mention Echols has a teenage(?) son ( from a former teenage girlfriend during the time he was convicted )… I think the boy’s like 18 now. How do you justify taking a father from a son’s life?



    Report this comment

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.