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‘Economic sociopath’ sentenced to 30 years

Troy A. Titus ran a Ponzi scheme that defrauded investors of nearly $12 million. Although it’s unlikely investors will get their money back, Titus was sentenced last year to 30 years in prison. The assistant U.S. Attorney called Titus an “economic sociopath.” The judge said to Titus, “You are a man without a conscience.”

Read Disbarred attorney sentenced to 30 years for fraud on PilotOnline.com.

Troy Titus was featured in an episode of the CNBC show American Greed. The show will air again on Monday, February 21 at 3 p.m. EST.

View a clip of American Greed: Financial Guru Gone Bad.

Story suggested by a Lovefraud reader.




15 Comments on "‘Economic sociopath’ sentenced to 30 years"

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  1. Truthspeak says:

    Blueskybluerain, I am so sorry to read of your experiences – welcome to LoveFraud.

    As Kim mentioned, sexual orientation doesn’t preclude or exclude anyone from being a sociopath. Spaths are predators – some claim to be gay/lesbian/hetero and are none of the above. They use just one aspect of the human condition in their arsenal of weapons to destroy empathetic human beings. We have a number of readers and posters who are gay and lesbian – they don’t often post, but I wish that they would.

    You’re in the right to recover and learn how to protect yourself from future predators.

    Brightest blessings



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  2. Nolongersilent says:

    I am in need of advice. In 2005 I married a man that I had know for almost 20 years. I was aware that he had “emotional” problems but he swore he was getting help, and in therapy. He appeared to be so much better in that regard. Later I found out it was all an act and a lie. To keep this short, after 4 1/2 years, he walked out on me. he left me with nothing. The vast majority of my money had been spent on him and his two children. For three years he had no paying job, no income, yet he was oh so happy to spend the money I had saved for 20 years. I paid for everything, including his child support. I sold my car when money became short. Over the course of the years we were married, I had become increasingly ill. I now can no longer work. I still care for 38 year old son that has been disabled since birth. After he walked out, I found documentation that he had been hiding money from me the entire time. We declared bankruptcy in 2008. The list of his hideous actions is very long. The list of all his lies is even longer. Since he walked out, I have been considering having the District Attorney file charges of fraud against him. When I sought a bit of advice on this, I was told that I have a well documented case for fraud. Now, for my question: Has anyone sought out this action against their sociopath? How emotionally difficult was that for you? What was the outcome of taking that legal action? I know that I will get no money out of taking this action. Money is not my goal. I wonder if he has any idea that he left all that documentation in our filing cabinet when he walked? There are times when I want to pursue this course, and there are times that I do not want to deal with the emotional trauma that I compare to what I went through during the divorce. The Texas State Statute of Limitations is 4 years, which means I have 2 years left to make up my mind.



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  3. skylar says:

    Nolongersilent,
    I think your name says it all.
    Imagine if all of Titus’ victims just accepted the screw job, Titus would still be free to continue.

    As for the pros and cons, here are the pros:
    If you can do it without trauma I think that it will be good for you to take back some of your power. Do it without emotions, consider it a task that has to be done like brushing your teeth and exercising. Don’t assign any emotional value to it.

    You have to decide based on how much power you have to actually make a difference. With power comes responsibility but don’t take more responsibility than you have power.

    That is what your spath forced on you and he left you financially powerless.

    The cons:
    know what the monster is capable of. Cover your butt in case he decides to cut your brakelines or set your house on fire while making it look like an accident. These monsters have no limits if they think they can get away with murder they will commit it. So you will have to make sure that everyone knows that if something happens to you, he will be the primary suspect. Then, also understand that he will have an alibi or a patsy. You will have to be vigilent.

    As you see, there is no easy answer, you’ll have to weigh the pros and cons. Definitely get advice from an attorney you can trust.



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  4. skylar says:

    This article brought back memories of my “friends” while I was in college. I’m now thinking that most of them were economic sociopaths.

    I didn’t need to work because of a legal settlement. The spath lived elsewhere but visited often. So I used to study with a Jewish guy who was married to a Jamaican woman who had an 8 year old boy. He said he had a trust fund so he didn’t have to work either.

    I met his family once and the wife used to send food for me because I was sick all the time, (from the strychnine the spath put in my food). She also picked out a Christmas present for me and sent it. Meanwhile, my friend was very nice and a great study partner, but one time he rubbed my leg inappropriately. I did not tell the spath, but one evening we were studying and the spath walked in. He looked so mad. He said, “Get dressed, I’m taking you to the Space Needle.” WTF? Spath never took me anywhere. Especially not somewhere that expensive.

    I think now, that my study partner was looking for an in on my money. I was too stupid to see that, but spath zeroed in on it. He had to defend his sugar mama and he made sure that the other rival figured it out.

    These people all recognize each other. We, the nieve targets, can’t even imagine how many parasites are out there. Looking back, I can see that so many people who were friendly with me, were just looking for a free ride or a hand out.



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  5. Ox Drover says:

    Dear No longer silent, there is a thread here about a man who went after the woman and her family who stole 1.2 million dollars from his senile father He has been successful in getting the woman put in federal prison and has liens against her family for the money she stole and gave to them It has been a long hard road for him but he is getting some justice and hopefully some of the money back.

    Not sure if you can get a DA to take it on. That can be a problem, and not sure how well your X hides the money…but if you want justice you will have to work hard at it, and maybe you will succeed.

    Donna Andersen the woman who owns this site got a judgment against her x but not a dollar back. And he did not go to jail either.

    So part of the answer is what you consider “justice” and what price you are willing to pay for it.



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  6. Nolongersilent says:

    Thank you so much for the insight and advice. I am still undecided as to what to do. What I failed to tell you is that my spath is part of the legal community here. During the divorce, I was unable to find any assistance. I was turned down by both legal aid organizations and the law school at a major university. I ended up with a pro bono friend of a friend that did absolutly nothing. You really do get what you pay for. I was treated unkindly and with bias by the mediator…..and the list goes on. Recently I tried to contact the CPA, that did our tax returns for several years, to see what the spath had told him about some inherited investments he had cashed in that I ended up paying the taxes on without ever knowing or seeing what he did with the funds he received. This CPA said he would need to look in our file to refresh his memory and would call me back. He did tell me that the spath had also contacted him recently. Has he called me back? You guessed it……no. So What lie has the spath told the CPA? I know that what I said in a online social network prompted him to contact the CPA. Is it horrible of me to take some satisfaction in the fact that what I said caused him at least a moment of panic? Frankly, and honestly, I am enjoying the heck out of that. If that makes me a bad person, then so be it. As ill as I am, and knowing the hell I would go through in charging him with fraud, I will probably do nothing. I regret that a great deal. If I was younger, in better health, and only had myself to consider, I would go after him in a heartbeat. With all the documentation I have, there is no doubt in my mind he would be found guilty. For now, I am going to hang on to that option. Who knows what future events may hold in store for me or my spath.

    Thanks again!



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